The Complete Chronicles of Narnia.pdf

The Complete Chronicles of Narnia.pdf
 

书籍描述

内容简介
The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven high fantasy novels by author C. S. Lewis. It is considered a classic of children's literature and is the author's best-known work, having sold over 100 million copies in 47 languages. Written by Lewis between 1949 and 1954, and originally published in London between October 1950 and March 1956, The Chronicles of Narnia has been adapted several times, complete or in part, for radio, television, the stage, and film.
Set in the fictional realm of Narnia, a fantasy world of magic, mythical beasts, and talking animals, the series narrates the adventures of various children who play central roles in the unfolding history of that world. Except in The Horse and His Boy, the protagonists are all children from the real world, magically transported to Narnia, where they are called upon by the lion Aslan to protect Narnia from evil and restore the throne to its rightful line. The books span the entire history of Narnia, from its creation in The Magician's Nephew to its eventual destruction in The Last Battle.

海报:

编辑推荐
“最伟大的牛津人”、一代宗师C•S•刘易斯写给孩子们的奇幻经典。《纳尼亚传奇全集(英文原版)》集神话、童话和传奇为一体,被誉为第二次世界大战以后英国最伟大的儿童文学作品。《纳尼亚传奇全集(英文原版)》在英美世界几乎是家喻户晓的儿童读物,也被一些批评家、出版商和教育界人士公认为20世纪最佳儿童图书之一。本套装为全英文原版,同时配以全书朗读文件,使读者在享受精彩故事的同时,也能提升英文阅读水平。

作者简介
Clive Staples Lewis (1898–1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.
Lewis wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. C. S. Lewis's most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Mere Christianity , Out of the Silent Planet , The Great Divorce , The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics in The Chronicles of Narnia . To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and been transformed into three major motion pictures.

目录
BookⅠ Magician’s Nephew
Chapter 1 The Wrong Door...................................................................................003
Chapter 2 Digory And His Uncle............................................................................011
Chapter 3 The Wood Between The Worlds...........................................................019
Chapter 4 The Bell And The Hammer...................................................................027
Chapter 5 The Deplorable Word...........................................................................035
Chapter 6 The Beginning Of Uncle Andrew’s Troubles........................................043
Chapter 7 What Happened At The Front Door......................................................051
Chapter 8 The Fight At The Lamp - post.................................................................059
Chapter 9 The Founding Of Narnia.......................................................................066
Chapter 10 The First Joke And Other Matters.......................................................074
Chapter 11 Digory And His Uncle Are Both In Trouble........................................082
Chapter 12 Strawberry ’s Adventure.......................................................................089
Chapter 13 An Unexpected Meeting......................................................................097
Chapter 14 The Planting Of The Tree....................................................................104
Chapter 15 The End Of This Story And The Beginning Of All The Others...........111

Book Ⅱ The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe
Chapter 1 Lucy Looks Into A Wardrobe.................................................................119
Chapter 2 What Lucy Found There........................................................................124
Chapter 3 Edmund And The Wardrobe.................................................................130
Chapter 4 Turkish Delight.....................................................................................135
Chapter 5 Back On This Side Of The Door............................................................141
Chapter 6 Into The Forest.....................................................................................147
Chapter 7 A Day With The Beavers........................................................................153
Chapter 8 What Happened After Dinner...............................................................160
Chapter 9 In The Witch’ s House............................................................................167
Chapter 10 The Spell Begins To Break..................................................................173
Chapter 11 Aslan Is Nearer....................................................................................180
Chapter 12 Peter’s First Battle...............................................................................187
Chapter 13 Deep Magic From The Dawn Of Time................................................193
Chapter 14 The Triumph Of The Witch.................................................................200
Chapter 15 Deeper Magic From Before The Dawn Of Time.................................206
Chapter 16 What Happened About The Statues....................................................212
Chapter 17 The Hunting Of The White Stag..........................................................218

Book Ⅲ The Horse And His Boy
Chapter 1 How Shasta Set Out On His Travels......................................................227
Chapter 2 A Wayside Adventure.............................................................................237
Chapter 3 At The Gates Of Tashbaan.....................................................................247
Chapter 4 Shasta Falls In With The Narnians........................................................256
Chapter 5 Prince Corin..........................................................................................265
Chapter 6 Shasta Among The Tombs.....................................................................274
Chapter 7 Aravis In Tashbaan................................................................................282
Chapter 8 In The House Of The Tisroc.................................................................291
Chapter 9 Across The Desert.................................................................................299
Chapter 10 The Hermit Of The Southern March...................................................308
Chapter 11 The Unwelcome Fellow Traveller.......................................................317
Chapter 12 Shasta In Narnia..................................................................................326
Chapter 13 The Fight At Anvard.............................................................................335
Chapter 14 How Bree Became A Wiser Horse.......................................................344
Chapter 15 Rabadash The Ridiculous....................................................................352

Book Ⅳ Prince Caspian
Chapter 1 The Island.............................................................................................363
Chapter 2 The Ancient Treasure House................................................................369
Chapter 3 The Dwarf..............................................................................................377
Chapter 4 The Dwarf Tells Of Prince Caspian.......................................................383
Chapter 5 Caspian ’s Adventure In The Mountains................................................392
Chapter 6 The People That Lived In Hiding..........................................................402
Chapter 7 Old Narnia In Danger............................................................................408
Chapter 8 How They Left The Island.....................................................................417
Chapter 9 What Lucy Saw......................................................................................426
Chapter 10 The Return Of The Lion......................................................................435
Chapter 11 The Lion Roars....................................................................................445
Chapter 12 Sorcery And Sudden Vengeance.........................................................453
Chapter 13 The High King In Command...............................................................462
Chapter 14 How All Were Very Busy.....................................................................470
Chapter 15 Aslan Makes A Door In The Air...........................................................479

Volume Ⅱ
Book Ⅴ The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
Chapter 1 The Picture In The Bedroom................................................................491
Chapter 2 On Board The Dawn Treader...............................................................499
Chapter 3 The Lone Islands...................................................................................509
Chapter 4 What Caspian Did There.......................................................................517
Chapter 5 The Storm And What Came Of It..........................................................525
Chapter 6 The Adventures Of Eustace...................................................................534
Chapter 7 How The Adventure Ended...................................................................543
Chapter 8 Two Narrow Escapes.............................................................................552
Chapter 9 The Island Of The Voices......................................................................562
Chapter 10 The Magician’s Book...........................................................................570
Chapter 11 The Dufflepuds Made Happy..............................................................579
Chapter 12 The Dark Island...................................................................................587
Chapter 13 The Three Sleepers.............................................................................595
Chapter 14 The Beginning Of The End Of The World..........................................603
Chapter 15 The Wonders Of The Last Sea.............................................................611
Chapter 16 The Very End Of The World................................................................619

Book Ⅵ The Silver Chair
Book Ⅶ The Last Battle

文摘
The Wrong Door

This is a story about something that happened long ago when your grandfather was a child. It is a very important story because it shows how all the comings and goings between our own world and the land of Narnia first began.
In those days Mr Sherlock Holmes was still living in Baker Street and the Bastables were looking for treasure in the Lewisham Road. In those days, if you were a boy you had to wear a stiff Eton collar every day, and schools were usually nastier than now. But meals were nicer; and as for sweets, I won’t tell you how cheap and good they were, because it would only make your mouth water in vain. And in those days there lived in London a girl called Polly Plummer.
She lived in one of a long row of houses which were all joined together. One morning she was out in the back garden when a boy scrambled up from the garden next door and put his face over the wall. Polly was very surprised because up till now there had never been any children in that house, but only Mr Ketterley and Miss Ketterley, a brother and sister, old bachelor and old maid, living together. So she looked up, full of curiosity. The face of the strange boy was very grubby. It could hardly have been grubbier if he had first rubbed his hands in the earth, and then had a good cry, and then dried his face with his hands. As a matter of fact, this was very nearly what he had been doing.
“Hullo,” said Polly.
“Hullo,” said the boy. “What’s your name?”
“Polly,” said Polly. “What’s yours?”
“Digory,” said the boy.
“I say, what a funny name!” said Polly.
“It isn’t half so funny as Polly,” said Digory.
“Yes it is,” said Polly.
“No, it isn’t,” said Digory.
“At any rate I do wash my face,” said Polly. “Which is what you need to do; especially after—” and then she stopped. She had been going to say “After you’ve been blubbing,” but she thought that wouldn’t be polite.
“All right, I have then,” said Digory in a much louder voice, like a boy who was so miserable that he didn’t care who knew he had been crying. “And so would you,” he went on, “if you’d lived all your life in the country and had a pony, and a river at the bottom of the garden, and then been
brought to live in a beastly Hole like this.”
“London isn’t a Hole,” said Polly indignantly. But the boy was too wound up to take any notice of her, and he went on—
“And if your father was away in India—and you had to come and live with an Aunt and an Uncle who’s mad (who would like that?)—and if the reason was that they were looking after your Mother—and if your Mother was ill and was going to—going to—die.” Then his face went the wrong sort of shape as it does if you’re trying to keep back your tears.
“I didn’t know. I’m sorry,” said Polly humbly. And then, because she hardly knew what to say, and also to turn Digory’s mind to cheerful subjects, she asked:
“Is Mr Ketterley really mad?”
“Well, either he’s mad,” said Digory, “or there’s some other mystery. He has a study on the top floor and Aunt Letty says I must never go up there. Well, that looks fishy to begin with. And then there’s another thing. Whenever he tries to say anything to me at meal times—he never even tries to talk to her—she always shuts him up. She says, ‘Don’t worry the boy, Andrew’ or ‘I’m sure Digory doesn’t want to hear about that’ or else ‘Now, Digory, wouldn’t you like to go out and play in the garden?’”
“What sort of things does he try to say?”
“I don’t know. He never gets far enough. But there’s more than that. One night—it was last night in fact—as I was going past the foot of the attic stairs on my way to bed (and I don’t much care for going past them either) I’m sure I heard a yell.”
“Perhaps he keeps a mad wife shut up there.”
“Yes, I’ve thought of that.”
“Or perhaps he’s a coiner.”
“Or he might have been a pirate, like the man at the beginning of Treasure Island, and be always hiding from his old shipmates.”
“How exciting!” said Polly, “I never knew your house was so interesting.”
“You may think it interesting,” said Digory. “But you wouldn’t like it if you had to sleep there. How would you like to lie awake listening for Uncle Andrew’s step to come creeping along the passage to your room? And he has such awful eyes.”
That was how Polly and Digory got to know one another: and as it was just the beginning of the summer holidays and neither of them was going to the sea that year, they met nearly every day.
Their adventures began chiefly because it was one of the wettest and coldest summers there had been for years.
That drove them to do indoor things: you might say, indoor exploration. It is wonderful how much exploring you can do with a stump of candle in a big house, or in a row of houses. Polly had discovered long ago that if you opened a certain little door in the box-room attic of her house you would find the cistern and a dark place behind it which you could get into by a little careful climbing. The dark place was like a long tunnel with brick wall on one side and sloping roof on the other. In the roof there were little chunks of light between the slates. There was no floor in this tunnel: you had to step from rafter to rafter, and between them there was only plaster. If you stepped on this you would find yourself falling through the ceiling of the room below. Polly had used the bit of the tunnel just beside the cistern as a smugglers’ cave. She had brought up bits of old packing cases and the seats of broken kitchen chairs, and things of that sort, and spread them across from rafter to rafter so as to make a bit of floor. Here she kept a cash-box containing various treasures, and a story she was writing and usually a few apples. She had often drunk a quiet bottle of gingerbeer in there: the old bottles made it look more like a smugglers’ cave.

购买书籍

当当网购书 京东购书 卓越购书

PDF电子书下载地址

相关书籍

搜索更多