Customizing Daily Life: Representing and Reforming Customs in Nineteenth-Century Japan.pdf

Customizing Daily Life: Representing and Reforming Customs in Nineteenth-Century Japan.pdf
 

书籍描述

作者简介
Suzanne G. O'Brien is Assistant Professor of History at Boston University.

内容简介
Throughout the Tokugawa era (1600--1868), the term fuzoku--variously translated as customs, morals, and daily life--assumed an increasingly prominent place in legal and popular discourse. Samurai officials and social critics attempted to mold the fuzoku of both samurai and the populace, while travelogues and fashion guides evaluated the realm's dizzying array of customs. By 1800, these discourses had rendered fuzoku a fundamental mode of mapping the nation as a coherent cultural entity. As Japan recast itself as a modern nation-state after 1868, fuzoku became an arena of intense struggle among government officials, journalists, historians, and civic activists, all of whom claimed special knowledge of customs and the moral authority to define, preserve, or "improve" them. Increasingly, everyday practices came to function as reflections of the state of the social order, markers of Japaneseness, or measures of Japan's progress toward "civilization." In the course of these contests, fuzoku became a primary means of apprehending national life that mediated Japan's induction into the imperialist world order and endures in Japanese political and popular culture to this day. Customizing Daily Life illuminates the intricate relations between the transformations in daily life across the nineteenth century and their conceptualization in contending discourses.

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