Moby Dick: or the White Whale.pdf

Moby Dick: or the White Whale.pdf
 

书籍描述

编辑推荐
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

名人推荐
From School Library Journal
Grade 5 Up-Opening with the classic line, "Call me Ishmael," the narrator's New England accent adds a touch of authenticity to this sometimes melodramatic presentation. The St. Charles Players do a credible job on the major roles, but some of the group responses, such as "Aye, aye Captain," sound more comic than serious. This adaptation retains a good measure of Melville's dialogue and key passages which afford listeners a vivid connection with the lengthy novel. Background music and appropriate sound effects enhance the telling of the story about Captain Ahab's obsessive pursuit of the malevolent white whale. The cassettes are clearly marked, and running times are noted on each side of the tapes. Announcements at the beginning of each side and a subtle chime signal at the end make it easy to follow the story, but a stereo player must be used to hear some dialogue. The lightweight cardboard package is inadequate for circulation. Done in a radio theatre format, the recording does a nice job of introducing the deeper themes of the book and covering the major events. For school libraries that support an American literature curriculum, this recording offers a different interpretation of an enduring classic.
Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library. Rocky Hill, CT
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
In a sense, this work is the piece de resistance of the textual revolution in American scholarship of the past generation. The first half is the final MLA "Approved Text" of the classic novel, prepared under the auspices of the Center for Editions of American Authors. The second half consists of an Historical Note detailing background, genetic composition, publication, and ensuing critical reception; a discussion of its textual history; and some relevant marginalia. The work is not only thorough and rigorous, but, considering the scholarly grittiness of the endeavor, surprisingly lucid and graceful in its exposition. Highly recommended for special collections. Earl Rovit, City Coll., CUNY
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


媒体推荐
In this production of Herman Melville's tale of a tragic whale hunt, narrator Anthony Heald not only creates vivid characterizations--Captain Ahab's gruff mania, Starbuck's doubtful sensitivity, the prophet Elijah's visionary shakiness--he also dramatizes the many moods of the Pequod crew and the mercurial ocean itself. Heald's voice has the range of a piano, and he uses it like a virtuoso. In one minute his reading can move from slow and languid, reflecting a dreamy day at sea, to alert and brisk, evoking the suspense of a whale sighting. Heald's voice bristles dryly with humor or sinks with dread--a range necessary to tell this complex story of a man's obsession with conquering an enigmatic white whale. --AudioFile

作者简介
Herman Melville is the author of MOBY DICK.

目录
LOOMINGS
THE CARPET-BAG
THE SPOUTER-INN
THE COUNTERPANE
BREAKFAST
THE STREET
THE CHAPEL
THE PULPIT
THE SERMON
A BOSOM FRIEND
NIGHTGOWN
BIOGRAPHICAL
WHEELBARROW
NANTUCKET
CHOWDER
THE SHIP
THE RAMADAN
HIS MARK
THE PROPHET
ALL ASTIR
GOING ABOARD
MERRY CHRISTMAS
THE LEE SHORE
THE ADVOCATE
POSTSCRIPT
KNIGHTS AND SQUIRES
KNIGHTS AND SQUIRES
AHAB
ENTER AHAB; TO HIM, STUBB
THE PIPE
QUEEN MAB
CETOLOGY
THE SPECKSYNDER
THE CABIN-TABLE
THE MAST-HEAD
THE QUARTER-DECK
SUNSET
DUSK
FIRST NIGHT-WATCH
MIDNIGHT, FORECASTLE
MOBY DICK
THE WHITENESS OF THE WHALE
HARK!
THE CHART
THE AFFIDAVIT
SURMISES
THE MAT-MAKER
THE FIRST LOWERING
THE HYENA
AHAB'S BOAT AND CREW. FEDALLAH
THE SPIRIT-SPOUT
THE ALBATROSS
THE GAM
THE TOWN-HO'S STORY
OF THE MONSTROUS PICTURES OF WHALES
OF THE LESS ERRONEOUS PICTURES OF WHALES, AND THE TRUE PICTURES OF WHALING SCENES
OF WHALES IN PAINT; IN TEETH; IN WOOD; IN SHEET-IRON; IN STONE; IN MOUNTAINS; IN STARS
BRIT
SQUID
THE LINE
STUBB KILLS A WHALE
THE DART
THE CROTCH
STUBB'S SUPPER
THE WHALE AS A DISH
THE SHARK MASSACRE
CUTTING IN
THE BLANKET
THE FUNERAL
THE SPHYNX
THE JEROBOAM'S STORY
THE MONKEY ROPE
STUBB AND FLASK KILL A RIGHT WHALE; AND THEN HAVE A TALK OVER HIM
THE SPERM WHALE'S HEAD — CONTRASTED VIEW
THE RIGHT WHALE'S HEAD — CONTRASTED VIEW
THE BATTERING-RAM
THE GREAT HEIDELBURGH TUN
CISTERN AND BUCKETS
THE PRAIRE
THE NUT
THE PEQUOD MEETS THE VIRGIN
THE HONOR AND GLORY OF WHALING
JONAH HISTORICALLY REGARDED
PITCHPOLING
THE FOUNTAIN
THE TAIL
THE GRAND ARMADA
SCHOOLS AND SCHOOLMASTERS
FAST-FISH AND LOOSE-FISH
HEADS OR TAILS
THE PEQUOD MEETS THE ROSE-BUD
AMBERGRIS
THE CASTAWAY
A SQUEEZE OF THE HAND
THE CASSOCK
THE TRY-WORKS
THE LAMP
STOWING DOWN AND CLEARING UP
THE DOUBLOON
LEG AND ARM THE PEQUOD, OF NANTUCKET, MEETS THE SAMUEL ENDERBY, OF LONDON
THE DECANTER
A BOWER IN THE ARSACIDES
MEASUREMENT OF THE WHALE'S SKELETON
THE FOSSIL WHALE
DOES THE WHALE'S MAGNITUDE DIMINISH? — WILL HE PERISH?
AHAB'S LEG
THE CARPENTER
AHAB AND THE CARPENTER
AHAB AND STARBUCK IN THE CABIN
QUEEQUEG IN HIS COFFIN
THE PACIFIC
THE BLACKSMITH
THE FORGE
THE GILDER
THE PEQUOD MEETS THE BACHELOR
THE DYING WHALE
THE WHALE WATCH
THE QUADRANT
THE CANDLES
THE DECK TOWARDS THE END OF THE FIRST NIGHT WATCH
MIDNIGHT — THE FORECASTLE BULWARKS
MIDNIGHT ALOFT — THUNDER AND LIGHTNING
THE MUSKET
THE NEEDLE
THE LOG AND LINE
THE LIFE-BUOY
THE DECK
THE PEQUOD MEETS THE RACHEL
THE CABIN
THE HAT
THE PEQUOD MEETS THE DELIGHT
THE SYMPHONY
THE CHASE — FIRST DAY
THE CHASE — SECOND DAY
THE CHASE — THIRD DAY

EPILOGUE
AFTERWORD

文摘
From Carl F. Hovde's Introduction to Moby-Dick

It is clear that Melville is not Ahab, nor is he Ishmael, though here the relationship is more complicated. "Call me Ishmael," chapter I begins: The borrowed name lets us know that he will tell us only what he wants to, and that he is a man apart from his fellows. The biblical Ishmael is the illegitimate son of Abraham by Rebecca's servant Hagar, and even though the Lord is good to Ishmael later in Genesis, his half-brother, Isaac, inherits the Lord's covenant through their father (Genesis 16, 17, 21, and 25).

Melville's narrator promptly describes dark thoughts approaching self-destruction: He pauses before coffin warehouses and follows every funeral he meets. But in the novel things don't remain so grim for long. Just as the Lord in Genesis is good to Ishmael despite his illegitimacy, so Melville's Ishmael floats to rescue with his best friend's burial box. The image of death has become the means to life, a change typical of Melville's density of view and sense of ambiguity. And the narrator's depressions spoken of at the beginning are modulated by the very language in which they are described: He is serious in describing his "spleen" and the "drizzly November" in his soul, but he presents them in a way that masks the pain even as it bodies it forth. The joking tone in which that account is developed is one we hear very often from the narrator even when he speaks of serious things.

The Ishmael we hear at the beginning is in some ways the book's most illusive character because, just as the biblical name suggests an outsider, a wanderer of sorts, he wanders in and out of the novel's narrative voice as it moves along. In the early chapters he is fully present as a character as he leads us toward the Pequod, but once on board he soon melds into the crew as his storytelling duties are taken over by the much more knowledgeable narrator whose arrival is not announced, but whose presence is clear as early as chapter XXIX when we overhear an exchange between Ahab and Stubb, the second mate.

They are on the quarterdeck, where Ishmael, as a common seaman, has no right to be unless working, and even if he were he could not overhear Stubb's private thoughts as he descends into the cabin. There is much in the book that Ishmael the crew member could not see or overhear: conversations between the ship's officers, Ahab's behavior at dinner with his officers, to say nothing of Ahab's private thoughts in a dramatic monologue complete with stage directions. In "Sunset" (chap. XXXVII), the scene is "The cabin; by the stern windows; Ahab sitting alone, and gazing out." As in the preceding chapter, "The Quarter Deck" (chap. XXXVI), we have suddenly changed literary genres-we are for a short time in a play, not a novel.

As the action requires of him, Ishmael now and then returns as a man with a particular role on the ship, someone who could not have the wider knowledge we are often given. In chapter LXXII he is at one end of a rope with Queequeg at the other; in chapter XCIV he is squeezing coagulated oil back into liquid; in chapter XCVI he almost capsizes the ship; in the Epilogue he is floating with Queequeg's coffin so that the ship Rachel can bring him back to tell the story.

These are inconsistencies, but how bothersome are they? Most readers have not been much troubled. Both narrators have the same voice and personality-one simply becomes the other, and it is best to think of them as the Ishmael who acts and the Ishmael who narrates, two functions of the same identity. Often enough we may not even notice the change from one to the other because we are caught up in the action and the strange brilliance of the style.

The book's general narrator occupies a position between Ishmael, on the one hand, and Melville, on the other. We don't confuse Melville with the other two-that shared personality is the author's construction to serve his ends. But it is true that Moby-Dick is an opinionated work, and it is not surprising that the narrator sometimes expresses views that we assume to be Melville's. This is true, for example, in "The Ship" (chap. XVI), where Melville seems to wonder what it will take to turn an old American sea captain into a noble figure worthy of the greatest classical tragedies. The paragraph is a virtual recipe for what Melville will do in creating Ahab later in the book, so much so that he might have written it after he had largely finished with Ahab, and placed it early in the book as a sign of what is to come.

There are also passages in which the narrator expresses directly to the reader opinions that are appropriate to the text and are views that Melville clearly held. After explaining how property rights are established after a dead whale is temporarily abandoned, he asks, "What to the ostentatious smuggling verbalists are the thoughts of thinkers but Loose-Fish? What is the great globe itself but a Loose-Fish! And what are you, reader, but a Loose-Fish and a Fast-Fish, too?" We should be annoyed if we thought that the story line were there only to set us up for the generalization, but Melville's gifts as a storyteller prevent this: The comment rises from the action. While the passage is not about Ahab, it implies what is wrong with him-in his arrogance and isolation he denies the inevitable interdependence of personal identity and community, one of the novel's great themes.

In a novel where ambition reaches out to some of the largest matters-man's position in the natural world, the nature of charismatic rule in its moral dimensions, the very nature of reality itself-there are notable exclusions in Moby-Dick, though not through oversight. Important aspects of daily life are less represented than one would usually expect in a novel: Food, sleep, hygiene, pastimes are hardly present, nor matters of health-important on such a vessel-except for Queequeg's illness.

These exclusions come about because the literary genre closest to Moby-Dick is not the traditional prose narrative, but the epic-a form in which the texture of common life is often treated lightly to allow concentration on the protagonist and heroic action. After the nights and steaks in New Bedford's Spouter Inn and the meals of Mrs. Hussey's Nantucket chowder, there is little detail of this kind once the Pequod leaves the dock, with four-fifths of the novel still to come.

编辑推荐
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

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