Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire.pdf

Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire.pdf


It's the pivotal fourth novel in the seven-part tale of Harry Potter's training as a wizard and his coming of age. Harry wants to get away from the pernicious Dursleys and go to the International Quidditch Cup with Hermione, Ron, and the Weasleys. He wants to dream about Cho Chang, his crush (and maybe do more than dream). He wants to find out about the mysterious event that's supposed to take place at Hogwarts this year, an event involving two other rival schools of magic, and a competition that hasn't happened for a hundred years. He wants to be a normal, fourteen-year-old wizard. Unfortunately for Harry Potter, he's not normal — even by wizarding standards.
And in his case, different can be deadly.

Customer Reviews
Reviewer: A reader
I had read the first 3 novels In the Harry Potter series and had found them extremely enjoyable page turners, Rowling creates a complete, magical world and her characters are always perfectly developed: You cheer when Harry stands up to Snape, You scowl inside when Malfoy turns up and you feel safe and secure when Dumbledore's around. But quite simply, the extrodinary and sensational "Harry Potter and the Goblet Of Fire" leaves the previous books In the dust. From the opening chapter you realise this Isn't going to be your average Harry Potter book, a character suspected of murder Is himself murdered at the hands of Lord Voldemort. I had always felt a Harry potter novel didn't get exciting until the story reached Hogwarts, this time Harry, Ron and Hermione travel to see a Qudditch World Cup which doesen't leave you dosing off waiting for the Hogwarts Express. But from then on the pace becomes consistently quicker, Harry's name Is put In a "Goblet Of Fire" which chooses contestants for a tournament involving other schools of witchcraft and wizardry. Harry is helped throughout the tournament by a new teacher "Mad Eye Moody" someone who you begin to trust throughout the story. Harry makes his way through the tournament tasks and unexpectactly finds himself face to face with Lord Voldemort, resulting In the death of not a prominant, but significant character. By the end things have got so messy you can only cringe at the things which are no doubt to come. This Is by far the most compelling instalment In the series. I've read critics complain Rowling Is writing directly at a more adult audience, this Is definetely not the case; For a start, Rowling already holds a huge adult audience with these books, parents enjoy them just as much as their children, also (like Harry himself) Rowling's prime audience of 8 to 12 year olds are growing up as well, I think It's fitting that children can grow up with these stories as they themselves become more mature. Although for especially young children of anyone under seven, parents should defineteley read along, the last hundred or so pages can be frightning and sometimes shocking. And as Dumbledore explains the stories events to Harry (and readers) Rowling has you flipping back hundreds of pages to realise just how intricately intwined the plot really Is. Simply an amazing read from cover to cover, "The Goblet Of Fire" Is to the previous Instalments what "The Empire Strikes Back" was to "Star Wars", It gives the series deeper meaning and makes an already enjoying tale Into something better than you thought It could be.

Reviewer: Timothy J. Henderson (San Diego, CA USA)
I found "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" to be just as exciting and entertaining as the previous books, if not more so. Rowlings is a great storyteller, and all her familiar trademarks are here: the colorful and eccentric characters, the humor, the playful use of words, the masterful cultivation of suspense. The book is over seven hundred pages long, but at the end you'll be wishing it were longer. There isn't a slow spot in it.
The story is, however, different in some ways from the previous ones. It's a lot darker and scarier, for one thing. Voldemort and his supporters play a prominent role in it, and their malice forms a palpable undercurrent in the plot from chapter one on. By the end of the story, you get to see just HOW evil Voldemort and his minions actually are. And let me tell you, they're pretty evil.

The other big difference is that Harry, Ron, Hermione and their friends are starting to grow up. The boys and girls have begun to notice each other now, and all the familiar problems of adolescence--jealousy, insecurity, fear of rejection, desire to fit in--or stand out--are starting to descend on them. I enjoy seeing the characters evolve in this way, but those who would rather they stay eternal 11-year-olds may be disappointed.

The story is not as self-contained as those in the previous books. Many plot lines are left open at the end, presumably to be resolved in books #5, 6, and 7. If you think you had a hard time waiting for "Goblet of Fire" to come out, wait till you finish it and are left thinking about the next one!

All in all, I highly recommend this book. If you're already a Harry Potter fan you won't be disappointed, and if you're not, reading it might very well make you one.

The Riddle House
The Scar
The Invitation
Back to the burrow
Weasleys'Wizard Wheezes
The Prtkey
Bagman and Crouch
The Quidditch World Cup
The Dark Mark
Mayhem at the Ministry

Book Description
Harry Potter is midway through his training as a wizard and his coming of age. Harry wants to get away from the pernicious Dursleys and go to the International Quidditch Cup. He wants to find out about the mysterious event that's supposed to take place at Hogwarts this year, an event involving two other rival schools of magic, and a competition that hasn't happened for a hundred years. He wants to be a normal, fourteen-year-old wizard. But unfortunately for Harry Potter, he's not normal - even by wizarding standards. And in his case, different can be deadly.

From Amazon.co.uk
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the long-awaited, heavily hyped fourth instalment of a phenomenally successful series that has captured the imagination of millions of readers, young and old, across the globe. For J K Rowling the pressure is certainly on to continue to come up with thrilling, pacey storylines that allow her hero to mature into a young man without detracting from the magical secret that has made Harry into a superstar. In this book, the teenage Harry has a certain gawky charm that fits well with his advancing adolescence. As the story moves on, Harry too moves on to a new level of maturity that leaves the reader wondering how he will learn from his experiences, and liking him all the more as a character.
Once returned to Hogwarts after his summer holiday with the dreadful Dursleys and an extraordinary outing to the Quidditch World Cup, the 14-year-old Harry and his fellow pupils are enraptured by the promise of the Triwizard Tournament: an ancient, ritualistic tournament that brings Hogwarts together with two other schools of wizardry--Durmstrang and Beauxbatons--in heated competition. But when Harry's name is pulled from the Goblet of Fire, and he is chosen to champion Hogwarts in the tournament, the trouble really begins. Still reeling from the effects of a terrifying nightmare that has left him shaken, and with the lightning-shaped scar on his head throbbing with pain (a sure sign that the evil Voldemort, Harry's sworn enemy, is close), Harry becomes at once the most popular boy in school. Yet, despite his fame, he is totally unprepared for the furore that follows.

This is a hefty volume: 636 pages, of which probably at least 200 could have been cut without detracting from the story. The weight and complexity of the book is perhaps a hint that Rowling now has her eye sharply focused on her adult audience, and the average child-reader (particularly one who is coming to Harry Potter for the first time) may well find its girth daunting. Rowling's ironic and pointed observations on tabloid journalism and the nature of media hype is just one of the references littered through the book that will tickle the grown-ups but may well fly over the heads of her young fans.

However, after a slow start, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire really starts to sparkle halfway through with Rowling's familiar magic (and yes, there is a death--sudden and tragic--and yes, Harry does start to notice girls). The crux of this story, however, is Harry's gradual coming-of-age and his handling of the increasingly determined threats to his own life.

This book is pivotal, not just for the author for whom the heat is well and truly on, but for Harry and his readers who, by the last chapter, are left in little doubt that there is much more to come. (Ages 10 to adult) --Susan Harrison

In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J.K. Rowling offers up equal parts danger and delight--and any number of dragons, house-elves, and death-defying challenges. Now 14, her orphan hero has only two more weeks with his Muggle relatives before returning to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Yet one night a vision harrowing enough to make his lightning-bolt-shaped scar burn has Harry on edge and contacting his godfather-in-hiding, Sirius Black. Happily, the prospect of attending the season's premier sporting event, the Quidditch World Cup, is enough to make Harry momentarily forget that Lord Voldemort and his sinister familiars--the Death Eaters--are out for murder.

Readers, we will cast a giant invisibility cloak over any more plot and reveal only that You-Know-Who is very much after Harry and that this year there will be no Quidditch matches between Gryffindor, Ravenclaw, Hufflepuff, and Slytherin. Instead, Hogwarts will vie with two other magicians' schools, the stylish Beauxbatons and the icy Durmstrang, in a Triwizard Tournament. Those chosen to compete will undergo three supreme tests. Could Harry be one of the lucky contenders?

But Quidditch buffs need not go into mourning: we get our share of this great game at the World Cup. Attempting to go incognito as Muggles, 100,000 witches and wizards converge on a "nice deserted moor." As ever, Rowling magicks up the details that make her world so vivid, and so comic. Several spectators' tents, for instance, are entirely unquotidian. One is a minipalace, complete with live peacocks; another has three floors and multiple turrets. And the sports paraphernalia on offer includes rosettes "squealing the names of the players" as well as "tiny models of Firebolts that really flew, and collectible figures of famous players, which strolled across the palm of your hand, preening themselves." Needless to say, the two teams are decidedly different, down to their mascots. Bulgaria is supported by the beautiful veela, who instantly enchant everyone--including Ireland's supporters--over to their side. Until, that is, thousands of tiny cheerleaders engage in some pyrotechnics of their own: "The leprechauns had risen into the air again, and this time, they formed a giant hand, which was making a very rude sign indeed at the veela across the field."

Long before her fourth installment appeared, Rowling warned that it would be darker, and it's true that every exhilaration is equaled by a moment that has us fearing for Harry's life, the book's emotions running as deep as its dangers. Along the way, though, she conjures up such new characters as Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody, a Dark Wizard catcher who may or may not be getting paranoid in his old age, and Rita Skeeter, who beetles around Hogwarts in search of stories. (This Daily Prophet scoop artist has a Quick-Quotes Quill that turns even the most innocent assertion into tabloid innuendo.) And at her bedazzling close, Rowling leaves several plot strands open, awaiting book 5. This fan is ready to wager that the author herself is part veela--her pen her wand, her commitment to her world complete. (Ages 9 and older)
                            --Kerry Fried

From School Library Journal
Grade 4 Up-Harry is now 14 years old and in his fourth year at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, where big changes are afoot. This year, instead of the usual Inter-House Quidditch Cup, a Triwizard Tournament will be held, during which three champions, one from each of three schools of wizardry (Hogwarts, Durmstrang, and Beaux-batons), must complete three challenging magical tasks. The competitors must be at least 17 years old, but the Goblet of Fire that determines the champions mysteriously produces Harry's name, so he becomes an unwilling fourth contestant. Meanwhile, it is obvious to the boy's allies that the evil Voldemort will use the Tournament to get at Harry. This hefty volume is brimming with all of the imagination, humor, and suspense that characterized the first books. So many characters, both new and familiar, are so busily scheming, spying, studying, worrying, fulminating, and suffering from unrequited first love that it is a wonder that Rowling can keep track, much less control, of all the plot lines. She does, though, balancing humor, malevolence, school-day tedium, and shocking revelations with the aplomb of a circus performer. The Triwizard Tournament itself is a bit of a letdown, since Harry is able, with a little help from his friends and even enemies, to perform the tasks easily. This fourth installment, with its deaths, a sinister ending, and an older and more shaken protagonist, surely marks the beginning of a very exciting and serious battle between the forces of light and dark, and Harry's fans will be right there with him.
                          Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library

From Publishers Weekly
In our Best Books citation, PW wrote, "The fourth Harry Potter adventure, centering on an inter-school competition, boasts details that are as ingenious and original as ever. A spectacular climax will leave readers breathless." Ages 8-12. (July)

From Beliefnet
There are some Christians who view these two activities as a contradiction--who think that Hogwarts is worse than hogwash, and that the magical scenarios of J.K. Rowling's imagination are inherently un-Christian. I would counter that, instead, these books have the potential to be profoundly Christian if readers can see past the medium (magic) to the novels' deeper messages about self-sacrifice, the triumph of good over evil, and the glorious possibility of human redemption. (Beliefnet, July 2000)--Book Dimension



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